From A Place Called Solid - West Virginia and Its Writers

The front of the map is dedicated to the oral literature that came before as exemplified in the works of Ruth Ann Musick, West Virginia folktale scholar: The Telltale Lilac Bush and Other West Virginia Ghost Tales (1965); Green Hills of Magic, West Virginia Folk Tales from Europe (1970) and Coffin Hollow and Other Ghost Tales (1976).

The map highlights 35 authors from the 35th state, writing during the time period 1863-2003, plus a West Virginia site often associated with them or their work along with a literary distinction. These authors and their works offer samples of some of the most significant imaginative literature written by authors of the state. In the printed version of the map the book symbol (see below) identifies the 35 authors selected for the front of the map; an asterisk * is used to identify them on this website.

The reverse side of the map is dedicated to three literary collaborators, each an essential link in preserving and promoting the literary history of West Virginia: Shirley Young Campbell, author, editor, playwright, poet, and catalyst for the founding of West Virginia Writers, Inc.; Jim Comstock, author, editor, historian, journalist, and publisher of West Virginia Hillbilly, The West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia, and more; and William Plumley, author, editor, educator, and poet.

In addition to the 35 authors selected for the front of the map, all listed on the reverse side further represent the findings of a statewide key-informant survey and other determining methods. The authors are also representative of those writing from 1863-2003 in six genre categories [children's/young adult literature, drama, fiction, memoir, poetry, and screenwriting]. In most cases, only one genre, title, and award are listed per author. However, most of the authors write in many genres and have numerous awards and honors.

The title phrase on the map is from Louise McNeill's memoir The Milkweed Ladies. Pittsburgh, PA: The University of Pittsburgh Press, 1985, p. 8.

On the reverse side the map's intent is summarized with a Pearl S. Buck quote, "...and there were generations of us there, all belonging together."
  - Pearl S. Buck from My Several Worlds. NY: John Day Company, 1954, p. 51.

     Phyllis Wilson Moore, Author

Book Symbol = the book symbol used on the printed map

Contact Info

The Frank and Jane Gabor
West Virginia Folklife Center

on the campus of Fairmont State University
1201 Locust Avenue
Fairmont, WV 26554
(304) 367-4403
wvfolklife@fairmontstate.edu


Pat Musick
Pat Musick
, Interim Director
Frank & Jane Gabor WV Folklife Center
(304) 333-3606
pmusick@fairmontstate.edu
 


 

FSUNow Stories

Monday, November 07, 2016

A series of events will honor Fairmont native and “Forgotten Hero” James Show Maddox.

“This is a really inspirational story of leadership and survival and is an account of a World War II incident involving a young U.S. Navy ensign who grew up on Pittsburgh Avenue in Fairmont,” said local historian M. Raymond Alvarez, who became fascinated by Maddox’s story and has written a 50-page local history publication titled “Forgotten Hero.”

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Wednesday, September 07, 2016

Kestrel: A Journal of Literature and Art, the Fairmont State University Department of Language and Literature and the Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center will host a two-day Celebration of Issue 35.

Ten Kestrel contributors will be on campus to participate in a panel discussion, as well as give readings from their own work.

On Friday, Sept. 23, from 1 to 1:50 p.m. in Jaynes Hall 304, Dr. Elizabeth Savage will moderate a panel discussion on the topic, “Accessibility,” featuring visiting writers. Admission to the event is free and open to the public.

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Tuesday, August 30, 2016

The Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center at Fairmont State University will officially open a new exhibition, “From Mountain Roots….” in its Ruth Ann Musick Gallery from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9.

Admission to the opening reception and the exhibit is free and open to the public. The exhibition will be on view through mid-February 2017. For more information, call (304) 367-4403.

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