Program Outcomes for the B.S. in Chemistry

Contact: Erica Harvey, eharvey@fairmontstate.edu

Date: February 23, 2008

 

Program Outcome Direct assessment measure Satisfactory performance standard

Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:

Student performance with respect to this outcome will be measured by:

Satisfactory student performance on the direct assessment measure will consist of:

1. Demonstrate competency in the laboratory skills expected of a practicing chemist. Specified outcomes in Advanced Integrated Laboratory (AIL)  
2. Demonstrate foundational knowledge needed by chemical professionals.

a. performance on ETS tests and ACS standardized exams

b. mastery status on selected outcomes in various courses

 
3. Solve chemistry problems using mathematical and computational tools. Performance on selected projects in Analytical (nonlinear least squares), PChem (open-ended problem), AIL (computation, rotational spectroscopy project).  
4. Apply foundational knowledge to analyze complex problems. Performance on selected projects in Inorganic chemistry and Advances in Modern Chemistry.  
5. Competently access, evaluate and learn new chemical information and skills.

a. Performance on Advances presentations and senior chemistry seminar.

b. Portfolio of laboratory work and writing.

 
6. Identify the relationships between chemistry and other disciplines, and the applications of chemistry in society.

Mastery of selected outcomes in specified courses

 
7. Speak, write and listen critically.

a. Senior seminar for speaking

b. AIL reports for writing

c. Advances presentations and questioning for listening

 

 

Chemistry Program Mission:

The mission of the Chemistry Program at Fairmont State is to help students gain a fundamental knowledge of modern chemistry, including the ability to apply computers, mathematics, biology and physics to the field. We expect and encourage our students to develop the analytical and problem-solving skills necessary to successfully pursue science-based careers.

Another integral part of our mission is to foster excellent oral and written skills, including high tech communication abilities.


The Chemistry Program Offers:

  • general studies courses
  • service courses for a variety of majors
  • a biotechnology area of emphasis
  • chemistry teaching specialization (grades 9-12)
  • minor in Chemistry
  • B.S. in Chemistry

Chemistry Program Outcomes (earlier version):

A student majoring in chemistry at Fairmont State University should:

  • Demonstrate competency in the laboratory and calculation skills expected of a practicing chemist. (Reproduce and extend experiments from the primary literature, design experimental protocols, troubleshoot experimental procedures and equipment. Use equipment widely found in employment and graduate school settings (hplc, nmr, gcms, aa, ir, uv-vis, emission/fluorescence, electrochemical equipment, Schlenk line, etc.))
  • Solve chemistry problems using mathematical and computational tools (use calculus, statistics, use software packages (Excel, Mathcad, Spartan), set up multi-step problems with a logical problem-solving structure)
  • Use and learn software and other tools efficiently and effectively. (Instrument control software, tools, etc.)
  • Learn how to learn new software, new situations, new problems.
  • Integrate the “big ideas and themes” in chemistry: e.g. structure representation, energetics and rates of processes. Learn how to pull all foundational knowledge and skills together to approach a new problem. Connect neural networks across courses. (conceptual structures used to organize chemical knowledge and apply these structures to solve complex chemical problems at the synthesis and evaluation levels.)
  • Identify the relationships between chemistry and other disciplines, and the applications of chemistry in society. Identify how your study of chemistry is/will impact your life.
  • Competently access, evaluate and learn new chemical information (Chemical Abstracts, primary literature, secondary data sources) and gain new skills through reading.
  • Speak and listen critically.
  • Demonstrate a firm grasp foundational knowledge needed by chemical professionals, as specified in course outcomes and threads appearing throughout our courses:
    • Molecular representations and communication skills like drawing (describing), naming and writing structures and formulas.
    • Bonding and structure models (quantum and classical and empirical).
    • Spectroscopy and its connection to properties of matter.
    • Properties of compounds and mixtures.
    • Structure of molecules governs reactivity,
    • Structure of biomolecules (size, shape, polarity) governs function/reactivity/in a biochemical reaction or system.
    • Products of reactions can be under thermodynamic or kinetic control; distinction between being at equilibrium and not at equilibrium, metastable states.
    • Rates and energetics of chemical reactions can be predicted and treated quantitatively.