CRIM 5504 Constitutional Law - 3hrs.

This course will deal with constitutional law relating to the function of the police and other government agents in our society, as well as the relationship between citizens and the government in the context of the Constitutional rights of citizens of the United States.

CRIM 5505 Terrorism - 3hrs.

A course designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of the problem of terrorism and political violence.  The student will define terrorism, examine its origins, characteristics, nature and trends, analyze in detail various terrorist organizations, and address selected problems in response to terrorism.

CRIM 5525 White Collar Crime - 3hrs.

Employs both the social science and legal approaches to examine crime committed by corporations as well as by individuals who wear “white collars”; covers how such crimes are socially defined, who commits them, who is victimized by them, which social contexts promote them and how society responds to them.

CRIM 5599 Special Topics - 3hrs.

Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of the department in a wide area of subjects directly related to law enforcement, courts, corrections or security.  Special topics courses permit innovative new courses on an experimental basis that addresses new developments in the field of criminal justice.  (Students may enroll in no more than 6 hours of Special Topics courses.)

CRIM 6601 Advanced Criminal Justice Studies - 3hrs.

This course will analyze of individual elements of the criminal justice process, including police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice and the analysis of interactions among these elements. The design of the course includes theoretical perspectives on criminal justice and the examination of empirical research. Students will explore the application of planning and other administrative processes to criminal justice.

CRIM 6602 Advanced Criminal Law - 3hrs.

Considers selected issues in substantive criminal law including the bases of culpability, burdens of proof, evidentiary standards, rationales for punishment, and defenses such as justification, insanity, and duress.

CRIM 6610 Advanced Penology - 3hrs.

Examines the development of ideologies pertaining to the punishment of offenders.  Explores the rationales for punishment and imprisonment, including deterrence, retribution, incapacitation, and rehabilitation.  Delves into alternatives to incarceration and evaluates recommendations for penal reform.

CRIM 6611 Internship - 3hrs.

A supervised professional study conducted in the criminal justice field setting.  It is designed to enhance the student’s academic experience through a planned program of observation, study and participation in a selected criminal justice agency.

CRIM 6615 Comparative Analysis of Criminal Justice Systems - 3hrs.

Compares and contrasts the criminal justice system in the United States with those of selected countries.  The course will cover similarities and differences in the administration, organization, functions, and objectives of the criminal justice process.

CRIM 6620 Advanced Theoretical Criminology - 3hrs.

Examines the historical development of criminological theories.  Considers biological, psychological and sociological explanations for criminal behavior.  Reviews key themes of classical, positivist, and critical criminology.  This course is required of all graduate students in the criminal justice program.

CRIM 6625 Victimology - 3hrs.

Examines the role of the victim in the crime process along with patterns and trends in victimization.  Identifies the categories of people facing the greatest risks and assesses victim-blaming arguments invoking facilitation, precipitation and provocation.  Analyzes the handling of street crime victims by the criminal justice system and explores the victims’ rights movement.

CRIM 6630 Seminar in Law Enforcement - 3hrs.

An analysis of the strategies and programs utilized in modern police work.  Previous research studies and contemporary methods for assessing the effectiveness of current practices are examined.

CRIM 6635 Seminar in Offender Rehabilitation - 3hrs.

An analysis of the strategies and programs utilized in modern offender rehabilitation.  Previous research studies and contemporary methods for assessing the effectiveness of current practices in treatment and rehabilitation are examined.

CRIM 6640 Seminar in Corrections - 3hrs.

An analysis of the strategies and programs utilized in modern penology.  Previous research studies and contemporary methods for assessing the effectiveness of current practices in corrections are examined.

CRIM 6645 Independent Study - 3hrs.

Research of a significant issue or problem in criminal justice.  Students involved in this course will conduct surveys and applied research projects as approved and supervised by a criminal justice faculty member.  Instructor and graduate program coordinator approval required.

CRIM 6650 Seminar in Criminal Justice Planning and Evaluation - 3hrs.

A systematic review of procedures to plan and evaluate criminal justice organizations and their operations with a focus on solutions to particular administrative problems associated with bureaucracy and complex organizations.  This course is required of all graduate students in the criminal justice program.

CRIM 6655 Applied Research Methods - 3hrs.

Examines the empirical and scientific perspectives in criminal justice.  Explores current research methods as they relate to criminal justice, application and interpretation of data from research problems, and the evaluation of research designs and their implementation in criminal justice. A unique feature of this course is that students will actually conduct research.  This course is required of all graduate students in the criminal justice program.  (PR: Undergraduate research methods course.)

CRIM 6656 Applied Statistics - 3hrs.

Presents the nature of the research process and guidelines for formulating research questions and testable hypotheses. Reviews the methods of operationalizing variables and indicators, collecting data, data analysis and fundamentals of statistical procedures commonly used in criminal justice research.  This course is required of all graduate students in the criminal justice program.  (PR: Undergraduate statistics course.)

CRIM 6696 Thesis I - 3hrs.

CRIM 6697 Thesis II - 3hrs.